NYJetsFan.com Forums: Peter Boyle Died - NYJetsFan.com Forums

Jump to content

Toggle shoutbox NYJETSFAN BANTER

Jets vs Chiefs Sunday 4:30est
MikeGangGree... Icon : (16 September 2016 - 10:09 AM) good
MikeGangGree... Icon : (16 September 2016 - 10:09 AM) Best day of the week is the day after a Jets Win!
Jetsfan115 Icon : (16 September 2016 - 10:12 AM) Rob you think the offense started off ugly? we scored on our first 4 drives, and controlled the ball 80% of the time the first half. We didn't even punt until the 2nd half
ROBJETS Icon : (16 September 2016 - 10:21 AM) I meant the hits on Fitz at on the first Drive or two with the fumbles and almost fumbles....The Tom Brady rule where balls that used to be fumbles are incomplete. We recovered the ball on all but one but it was ruled incomplete
ROBJETS Icon : (16 September 2016 - 10:26 AM) The offensive line stepped off after Hughes got hurt for however long he was out. I don't blame J. Marsh for that fumble because that was just a hell of a play. Imo Fitz had a career best game even with only 1 td passing. Never seen him so accurate. So yeah when I meant ugly I meant dline penetration and the 1st two drives ending up in fieldgoals
ROBJETS Icon : (16 September 2016 - 10:30 AM) But 31 points given up passing by the defense passing was bad. It wasn't just 2 long bombs and that defensive touchdown leading to 21 points. 3q1 against a bad team was terrible for the defense. Without the offense putting up 37 the Jets,would have lost so yeah I consider it an ugly start on both ends
ROBJETS Icon : (16 September 2016 - 10:32 AM) I'm glad like everyone else that the Jets won. Especially with getting with by the Bills multiple times it was nice revenge.
ROBJETS Icon : (16 September 2016 - 10:34 AM) Just saying that the Bills look like a bad team this year and the Jets have to face a lot of teams that are probably playoff bound again so yes there is a lot of concern
Jetsfan115 Icon : (16 September 2016 - 11:39 AM) fitz look good and lets not forget the 50+ yarder to decker that was called back on a BS holding penalty. plus if you rewatch it, the jets d-line was getting held like crazy and never got calls. I seen McLendon, williams, and wilk all complaining about it
azjetfan Icon : (16 September 2016 - 12:32 PM) I think the game plan for the D was to keep Taylor in the pocker
azjetfan Icon : (16 September 2016 - 12:33 PM) They didn't want him running around when they only rushed 3-4 guts
Jetsfan115 Icon : (16 September 2016 - 12:37 PM) bills fired their OC today after the loss yesterday lol
Jetsfan115 Icon : (16 September 2016 - 12:38 PM) yeah we didn't really rush, we just tried to keep contain on the outside and collapse the middle
Jetsfan115 Icon : (16 September 2016 - 12:38 PM) on the salas TD, one of our LBers went for the sack and broke contain and pryor got away and made the play
Jetsfan115 Icon : (16 September 2016 - 12:39 PM) when we did rush which was rare, we had a spy
ROBJETS Icon : (16 September 2016 - 11:11 PM) As far as the Bills firing the oc I'm not sure I agree with it with Watkins having major foot problem with a steel rod in his surgically repaired foot but I dont follow the Bills so cant really say. I do think they need to get rid of Rob Ryan though. He had a decent year with the Browns then was terrible with the Cowboys and Saints. He isn't half the DC that Rex is. I still think Rex can be a good head coach withe the right coaches and roster but Rob Ryan isn't the answer. But if Rex wants to ruin his chance of staying a head coach by keeping his brother on the coaching staff like he ruined his head coaching job keeping Sanchez as a starter then that's his stupidity
ganggreen2003 Icon : (17 September 2016 - 12:20 AM) The A Football Life of Curtis Martin is a MUST WATCH!!!!
Jetsfan0099 Icon : (17 September 2016 - 02:03 PM) They got rid of their OC after their defense was ripped apart
ROBJETS Icon : (17 September 2016 - 05:03 PM) Well hell that makes even less sense. The defense gets ripped apart so let's get rid of the oc instead of the dc.they didn't have much of a run game but a lot of passes yards. If they wanted to blame anyone for nearly 40 points against them it was their defense. But guess Rex used the ocean as the scale goat instead of his brother
ROBJETS Icon : (17 September 2016 - 05:04 PM) Oc not ocean. Damn Auto correct on phone
ROBJETS Icon : (17 September 2016 - 05:04 PM) And scape goatee
ROBJETS Icon : (17 September 2016 - 05:05 PM) Lol still can't get it right
ROBJETS Icon : (17 September 2016 - 05:13 PM) Not sure about anyone else but I'm extremely interested in the 49r/ Panther game at 1pm. Just want to see if the 49rs are actually good this year or if the Rams have become one of the worst teams in the league this year
ROBJETS Icon : (17 September 2016 - 05:16 PM) If the Rams have regressed that much then all the Todd Gurley owners in fantasy will likely have low points from him all year. Might even be worth trying to trade him early if they look just as bad this week before his stock drops
ROBJETS Icon : (17 September 2016 - 05:26 PM) I drafted him last year and also had David Johnson, Chris Johnson, Roetlesburger, Romo, Palmer, Barnage,, .....my whole team was stacked with starters. Entire team wasc stacked with starters. Even bench. Made tge Superbowl but did have a rough start at behinning of season when Romo and Roethlisberger wentvdown at the start of season also lost amazing starting rb and wr all within the 1st 4 games but worked the waivers really well..shut out until garbage time by a team that was terrible last year
ROBJETS Icon : (17 September 2016 - 05:28 PM) Last part meant Rams were shut out entire game even in garbage time against 49r backups
ROBJETS Icon : (17 September 2016 - 05:29 PM) Sorry about typos. Hard to type on small phone screen
MikeGangGree... Icon : (17 September 2016 - 06:00 PM) This is why I'm glad Rex is gone. Fire the OC after the D gives up 500 yards??
MikeGangGree... Icon : (17 September 2016 - 06:01 PM) UPDATE THE UPDATE!!!!
ROBJETS Icon : (17 September 2016 - 06:25 PM) Yep Rex isn't a bad coach but he needs to have all player and coach decisions as far as firing and hiring taken out of his hands. His problem is he doesn't know to separate the job from loyalty to players and is unable to let underperforming players go
ROBJETS Icon : (17 September 2016 - 06:27 PM) He was great as a DC because he wasn't in charge of roster and firing decisions. He will never make it as a good head coach until he can get rid of loyalty and run a team like any boss runs a business.
azjetfan Icon : (17 September 2016 - 07:16 PM) I loved Rex as a person. But he is severely handicapped in his skill set as a HC. He has not adapted and will not adapt. That's why he isn't here and will be fired from Buffalo.
ROBJETS Icon : (18 September 2016 - 11:05 AM) It's all guessing and I will like likely stick with my two starters that are injured and playing but D.Thomas looks like he is still in a lot of pain and Stewart is still in the locker room getting ankle treatment so both could be on a snap count
ROBJETS Icon : (18 September 2016 - 11:06 AM) I have good wr's on bench and good rb's on bench but they have bad matchups. Do t trust Diggs against Greenbay or Doug Martin against Arizona both on bench
ROBJETS Icon : (18 September 2016 - 11:08 AM) If I made changes I have Crabtree for Oakland Aagainst Atlanta and Abdullah for Detroit against 49rs as my two options I would choose if I made any changes
ROBJETS Icon : (18 September 2016 - 11:10 AM) Actually have it backwards with my running back teams
ROBJETS Icon : (18 September 2016 - 11:12 AM) Detroit vs Titans who I believe has a legit defense. Panthers have a better team but the ankle for Stewart and both the Titans and 49rs are ranked #1 against the run. Not a believer in the 49rs defensesthough
ROBJETS Icon : (18 September 2016 - 11:13 AM) Believe the Rams oline just sucks
ROBJETS Icon : (18 September 2016 - 11:15 AM) Abdullah splits carries but he did get 17 last week and also catches a lot of passes and has a better qb so could exploit the Titans still
ROBJETS Icon : (18 September 2016 - 11:16 AM) Will most likely do my own thing anyway just looking for input from those that actually study in fantasy if anyone feels like offering their opinions. If not it's cool too. Thanks
ROBJETS Icon : (18 September 2016 - 11:18 AM) If not for the injuries to the two players I'd keep them in for sure but all it takes for Thomas is a hit to the hip and a tackle by the ankle for Stewart if they aren't on a snap count already or if pain doesn't get to them.
ROBJETS Icon : (18 September 2016 - 12:45 PM) Well looks like leaving in Stewart was,a,bad move in locker room
MikeGangGree... Icon : (18 September 2016 - 04:54 PM) Good news! Dolphins suck
santana Icon : (19 September 2016 - 08:08 AM) Thanks professor
Jetsfan115 Icon : (23 September 2016 - 03:55 PM) updated roster. FB howsare released, TE bowman added to roster
Resize Shouts Area

Page 1 of 1
  • You cannot start a new topic
  • This topic is locked

Peter Boyle Died

#1 Guest_JCBizkit87_*

  • Group: Guests

Posted 13 December 2006 - 03:08 PM

http://www.nytimes.c...artner=homepage

Peter Boyle, who left the life of a monk to study acting and went on to become one of the most successful character actors of his time in films like “The Candidate,” “Young Frankenstein” and “Monster’s Ball,” then capped his career with a long stint as the meddlesome father on the hit sitcom “Everybody Loves Raymond,” died Tuesday evening in Manhattan. He was 71.

His death, at New York Presbyterian Hospital, was announced by his publicist, Jennifer Plante. She said Mr. Boyle had suffered from multiple myeloma and heart disease. With his bulky frame and balding pate, Mr. Boyle was a formidable presence on screen, whether playing a drunken redneck (“Joe”), a corrupt union leader (“F.I.S.T.”) or a savvy private eye (“Hammett”). He could be convincingly chilling, so much so that he often ran the risk of being typecast. When he appeared with Peter Falk and Paul Sorvino in William Friedkin’s 1978 film “The Brink’s Job,” as a member of the gang that robs an armored car company of nearly $3 million, the New York Times critic Vincent Canby wrote that “Mr. Boyle’s role is one that he could telephone in by this time.”

But it wasn’t all thugs and gangsters. In 1974, Mr. Boyle made a memorable impression in Mel Brooks’s “Young Frankenstein,” in which he played the bumbling monster brought to life by the addled grandson (Gene Wilder) of the original Dr. Frankenstein. In one high point, Mr. Boyle’s monster, decked out in white tie and tails à la Fred Astaire, performed a nifty soft-shoe routine with Mr. Wilder while bellowing out the lyrics of “Puttin’ On the Ritz.”

Mr. Boyle, who once admitted to being “a little nutty,” enjoyed his infrequent ventures into film comedy. In “Where the Buffalo Roam” (1980), a screen portrait of the freewheeling writer Hunter S. Thompson (Bill Murray), he went happily wild as the writer’s carousing companion. Along with members of the Monty Python troupe, he was part of a zany pirate crew in “Yellowbeard” (1983). And in “The Dream Team” (1989), he tried to wring laughs from his role as a mental patient with a fixation on Jesus.

His breakthrough, however, was no laughing matter. He won the title role in the 1970 film “Joe,” about a hard-drinking, hate-filled factory worker who improbably joins forces with a murderous executive in a bloody war on “hippies” and the rest of the counterculture. Mr. Boyle said that he was paid only $3,000 for his work in “Joe” but that he realized he had taken a giant step forward. The role, he said at the time, seemed to have been made for him because he’d grown up surrounded by people like Joe.

“I knew the character so well that when it came to the actual shooting of the movie, I was worried that I would do a caricature,” “ he said. Writing in The Times, Mr. Canby called “Joe” one of the 10 worst films of the year but hailed Mr. Boyle’s performance as “extraordinary.”

Peter Boyle was born on Oct. 18, 1935, in Northtown, Pa. After graduating from La Salle College, he became a member of the Christian Brothers order and entered a monastery as Brother Francis. He later recalled praying “so hard, I had calluses on my knees.” After three effortful years, he left the monastery — he later called it “an unnatural way to live” — and, after a brief period in the Navy that ended in a nervous breakdown, came to New York City to try the life of an actor.

There, he studied with Uta Hagen, worked at whatever jobs he could find, toured with a road company of Neil Simon’s “Odd Couple” and wound up in Chicago, where he joined the Second City troupe and immersed himself in improvisational theater. He was living in Chicago at the time of the Democratic National Convention in 1968 and never forgot the ensuing explosion of violence and the reek of tear gas in the streets. Early on, he described himself as a “conservative radical.”

Politics was an element in some of his work in the years ahead, although more often on television than in film. An exception was “The Candidate” (1972), the film in which he played a cool-headed campaign manager for a liberal Democrat (Robert Redford) running for the Senate. In the 1977 NBC movie “Tail Gunner Joe,” he portrayed Senator Joseph R. McCarthy, with Burgess Meredith as the Boston lawyer Joseph Welch in the notorious Army-McCarthy hearings.

Mr. Boyle relived his 1968 experience in Chicago on HBO’s “Conspiracy: The Trial of the Chicago Eight” (1987), appearing as one of the jailed political protesters, David Dellinger. And in the 1989 CBS docudrama “Guts and Glory: The Rise and Fall of Oliver North,” he played Vice Admiral John M. Poindexter, a national security adviser.

Despite his early theatrical training, Mr. Boyle clearly preferred film and television over stage work. He was seen on Broadway in 1980 in “The Roast,” directed by Carl Reiner, in which he played a comedian who is the guest of honor, with lots to hide, at a no-holds-barred “roast,” or stag dinner, given by his fellow comics. Off Broadway later that year, he co-starred with Tommy Lee Jones in a Public Theater production of Sam Shepard’s “True West,” about the warring relationship of two brothers. He also appeared at the Circle Repertory in 1982 in the ill-conceived “Snow Orchid,” a play by Joe Pintauro in which he played the mentally unstable head of a dysfunctional family in the Williamsburg section of Brooklyn.

In his private life, Mr. Boyle was a functional and devoted family man. He had met Loraine Alterman, his wife-to-be, when he was filming “Young Frankenstein” and she was interviewing Mel Brooks for Rolling Stone magazine. They were married in 1977, with John Lennon as best man at their wedding. She survives him, along with their daughters Lucy and Amy.

Mr. Boyle’s film credits in the late ‘80s and early ‘90s included “Walker” (1987), in which Ed Harris played the American adventurer William Walker, who briefly seized control of Nicaragua in the mid-19th century; Mr. Boyle played his supporter Commodore Cornelius Vanderbilt. In “Bulletproof Heart” (1995), Mr. Boyle was cast as a professional hitman. In “Monster’s Ball” (2001), he gave an acclaimed performance as the bigoted father of a prison death-house guard (Billy Bob Thornton).

Mr. Boyle was also becoming a familiar face on television, appearing in several episodes of ABC’s “NYPD Blue” and winning an Emmy Award in 1996 for a guest appearance on the long-running Fox series “The X-Files.” That was also the year Mr. Boyle became a member of the Barone family on the durable CBS sitcom “Everybody Loves Raymond.”

The series starred the comedian Ray Romano as Ray Barone, a sportswriter whose parents (played by Mr. Boyle and Doris Roberts) are all too willing to complicate daily life in Ray’s suburban household. As the grouchy, wisecracking Frank Barone, Mr. Boyle could be counted on to win laughs, as he did for nine seasons. The role brought him five Emmy nominations.

Mr. Boyle suffered a stroke in 1990 and had a heart attack while taping an episode of “Raymond” in 1999, but he quickly recovered and continued his career, pursuing what he called his challenge on “Raymond” — “finding where the funny is.”
0

#2 User is offline   S-Dubb Icon

  • 2008 Best Insider Award
  • Icon
  • View blog
  • Group: Assistant Admin
  • Posts: 31,145
  • Joined: 02-May 05
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:---
  • Interests:Hardcore Jets & Knicks fan - Gym rat - health and nutrition - family man and proud father.

    Twitter: @NYJETSFANCOM

  • NFL Team:

  • MLB:

Posted 15 December 2006 - 03:45 AM

I never really knew much about him untill Raymond but this guys was funny. He played a racist old man in anyother movie that I can't remember and thought he did a good job. His mundane/dry humor was hella funny at times.
0

#3 User is offline   HarlemHxC814 Icon

  • 06 Best Avatar Award / N.O.P. GUARD
  • Icon
  • Group: Moderator
  • Posts: 5,173
  • Joined: 30-March 05
  • Gender:Male

  • NFL Team:

  • MLB:

Posted 15 December 2006 - 10:20 AM

QUOTE (S-Dubb @ Dec 15 2006, 04:20 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I never really knew much about him untill Raymond but this guys was funny. He played a racist old man in anyother movie that I can't remember and thought he did a good job. His mundane/dry humor was hella funny at times.


The movie was Monster's Ball...that Halle Berry one.
Posted Image
0

#4 Guest_JCBizkit87_*

  • Group: Guests

Posted 15 December 2006 - 12:32 PM

All I know is that this guy brought a whole new term to the word Holy Crap.
0

#5 User is offline   #73jetsfan Icon

  • Line Coach
  • Icon
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 923
  • Joined: 08-August 05
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Long Island NY
  • Interests:Martial Arts, Music Art, and Sports

  • NFL Team:

  • MLB:

Posted 15 December 2006 - 03:39 PM

QUOTE (JCBizkit87 @ Dec 13 2006, 03:43 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
http://www.nytimes.c...artner=homepage

Peter Boyle, who left the life of a monk to study acting and went on to become one of the most successful character actors of his time in films like “The Candidate,” “Young Frankenstein” and “Monster’s Ball,” then capped his career with a long stint as the meddlesome father on the hit sitcom “Everybody Loves Raymond,” died Tuesday evening in Manhattan. He was 71.

His death, at New York Presbyterian Hospital, was announced by his publicist, Jennifer Plante. She said Mr. Boyle had suffered from multiple myeloma and heart disease. With his bulky frame and balding pate, Mr. Boyle was a formidable presence on screen, whether playing a drunken redneck (“Joe”), a corrupt union leader (“F.I.S.T.”) or a savvy private eye (“Hammett”). He could be convincingly chilling, so much so that he often ran the risk of being typecast. When he appeared with Peter Falk and Paul Sorvino in William Friedkin’s 1978 film “The Brink’s Job,” as a member of the gang that robs an armored car company of nearly $3 million, the New York Times critic Vincent Canby wrote that “Mr. Boyle’s role is one that he could telephone in by this time.”

But it wasn’t all thugs and gangsters. In 1974, Mr. Boyle made a memorable impression in Mel Brooks’s “Young Frankenstein,” in which he played the bumbling monster brought to life by the addled grandson (Gene Wilder) of the original Dr. Frankenstein. In one high point, Mr. Boyle’s monster, decked out in white tie and tails à la Fred Astaire, performed a nifty soft-shoe routine with Mr. Wilder while bellowing out the lyrics of “Puttin’ On the Ritz.”

Mr. Boyle, who once admitted to being “a little nutty,” enjoyed his infrequent ventures into film comedy. In “Where the Buffalo Roam” (1980), a screen portrait of the freewheeling writer Hunter S. Thompson (Bill Murray), he went happily wild as the writer’s carousing companion. Along with members of the Monty Python troupe, he was part of a zany pirate crew in “Yellowbeard” (1983). And in “The Dream Team” (1989), he tried to wring laughs from his role as a mental patient with a fixation on Jesus.

His breakthrough, however, was no laughing matter. He won the title role in the 1970 film “Joe,” about a hard-drinking, hate-filled factory worker who improbably joins forces with a murderous executive in a bloody war on “hippies” and the rest of the counterculture. Mr. Boyle said that he was paid only $3,000 for his work in “Joe” but that he realized he had taken a giant step forward. The role, he said at the time, seemed to have been made for him because he’d grown up surrounded by people like Joe.

“I knew the character so well that when it came to the actual shooting of the movie, I was worried that I would do a caricature,” “ he said. Writing in The Times, Mr. Canby called “Joe” one of the 10 worst films of the year but hailed Mr. Boyle’s performance as “extraordinary.”

Peter Boyle was born on Oct. 18, 1935, in Northtown, Pa. After graduating from La Salle College, he became a member of the Christian Brothers order and entered a monastery as Brother Francis. He later recalled praying “so hard, I had calluses on my knees.” After three effortful years, he left the monastery — he later called it “an unnatural way to live” — and, after a brief period in the Navy that ended in a nervous breakdown, came to New York City to try the life of an actor.

There, he studied with Uta Hagen, worked at whatever jobs he could find, toured with a road company of Neil Simon’s “Odd Couple” and wound up in Chicago, where he joined the Second City troupe and immersed himself in improvisational theater. He was living in Chicago at the time of the Democratic National Convention in 1968 and never forgot the ensuing explosion of violence and the reek of tear gas in the streets. Early on, he described himself as a “conservative radical.”

Politics was an element in some of his work in the years ahead, although more often on television than in film. An exception was “The Candidate” (1972), the film in which he played a cool-headed campaign manager for a liberal Democrat (Robert Redford) running for the Senate. In the 1977 NBC movie “Tail Gunner Joe,” he portrayed Senator Joseph R. McCarthy, with Burgess Meredith as the Boston lawyer Joseph Welch in the notorious Army-McCarthy hearings.

Mr. Boyle relived his 1968 experience in Chicago on HBO’s “Conspiracy: The Trial of the Chicago Eight” (1987), appearing as one of the jailed political protesters, David Dellinger. And in the 1989 CBS docudrama “Guts and Glory: The Rise and Fall of Oliver North,” he played Vice Admiral John M. Poindexter, a national security adviser.

Despite his early theatrical training, Mr. Boyle clearly preferred film and television over stage work. He was seen on Broadway in 1980 in “The Roast,” directed by Carl Reiner, in which he played a comedian who is the guest of honor, with lots to hide, at a no-holds-barred “roast,” or stag dinner, given by his fellow comics. Off Broadway later that year, he co-starred with Tommy Lee Jones in a Public Theater production of Sam Shepard’s “True West,” about the warring relationship of two brothers. He also appeared at the Circle Repertory in 1982 in the ill-conceived “Snow Orchid,” a play by Joe Pintauro in which he played the mentally unstable head of a dysfunctional family in the Williamsburg section of Brooklyn.

In his private life, Mr. Boyle was a functional and devoted family man. He had met Loraine Alterman, his wife-to-be, when he was filming “Young Frankenstein” and she was interviewing Mel Brooks for Rolling Stone magazine. They were married in 1977, with John Lennon as best man at their wedding. She survives him, along with their daughters Lucy and Amy.

Mr. Boyle’s film credits in the late ‘80s and early ‘90s included “Walker” (1987), in which Ed Harris played the American adventurer William Walker, who briefly seized control of Nicaragua in the mid-19th century; Mr. Boyle played his supporter Commodore Cornelius Vanderbilt. In “Bulletproof Heart” (1995), Mr. Boyle was cast as a professional hitman. In “Monster’s Ball” (2001), he gave an acclaimed performance as the bigoted father of a prison death-house guard (Billy Bob Thornton).

Mr. Boyle was also becoming a familiar face on television, appearing in several episodes of ABC’s “NYPD Blue” and winning an Emmy Award in 1996 for a guest appearance on the long-running Fox series “The X-Files.” That was also the year Mr. Boyle became a member of the Barone family on the durable CBS sitcom “Everybody Loves Raymond.”

The series starred the comedian Ray Romano as Ray Barone, a sportswriter whose parents (played by Mr. Boyle and Doris Roberts) are all too willing to complicate daily life in Ray’s suburban household. As the grouchy, wisecracking Frank Barone, Mr. Boyle could be counted on to win laughs, as he did for nine seasons. The role brought him five Emmy nominations.

Mr. Boyle suffered a stroke in 1990 and had a heart attack while taping an episode of “Raymond” in 1999, but he quickly recovered and continued his career, pursuing what he called his challenge on “Raymond” — “finding where the funny is.”



Good actor ! May he RIP, Thoughts to his family.
" Using No Way as Way, Having No Limitation, as Limitation" - Bruce Lee


"You must show no mercy nor have any belief
whatsoever in how others judge you ,
For your greatness will silence them all !"
-Warrior
0

#6 User is offline   RyanLeaf16 Icon

  • Free Agent
  • Icon
  • View blog
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 30
  • Joined: 21-February 07

  • NFL Team:

  • MLB:

Posted 06 March 2007 - 08:54 PM

well if anyone finds this i will reveal who i am. i am green_blood, i apologize any inconveniences created, but RyanLeaf16 was the embodiment of my sarcasm of how you guys flip flop, one week youre in love with tangini, then a couple days later, you hate them for not jumping on subpar free agents. also, turner-ism was a major influence on this fiasco, my apologies and hopefully no one takes it the wrong way. sorry guys, i couldnt help it.
[size=3]hey guys, im green_blood
0

Page 1 of 1
  • You cannot start a new topic
  • This topic is locked

1 User(s) are reading this topic
0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users